I like well made games, and much of that banks on inclusion and intersectionality.


I'd love to play with you online (when I get the chance)
PSN: Uchlaraai
XBox One: a real wizerd
3DS: 0103-9717-4663


Current Games:
~Animal Crossing New Leaf (Lost, tragically lost)
~Fire Emblem: Awakening
~Ni No Kuni
~*Bravely Default Demo
-Titanfall
Reblogged from witchtimez  9,757 notes

fatandbadatsports:

Let us not forget one of the most important things about the Universal Monsters era: The Creature From The Black Lagoon was created by a woman, Milicent Patrick.

Nearly unheard of at the time, ms Patrick is responsible for creating one of the single most recognizable characters, not only in Universal history but in all of film history. She was an incredible talent and she should be honored as such.

Reblogged from thegamingmuse  1,196 notes

"Too often we see female characters pitted against each other for jobs or for men. While the ladies on Brooklyn Nine-Nine are certainly competitive, they do not tear each other down or view each other as rivals. [They] are all wildly different characters, but they come together to support each other as friends and colleagues." (x)

Reblogged from paperwhale  9,578 notes
theatlantic:

The Nun Who Got Addicted to Twitter

“My superior is a gamer.” Sister Helena Burns said, laughing. “You know you’re a media nun when your superior is a gamer.” 
You might not expect nuns to be experts on Twitter, Facebook, and multi-player video games, but Burns defies all expectations. With 13,790 Twitter followers and counting, the Daughter of St. Paul calls herself a “media nun”: A woman religious with a calling to communicate the word of Christ, in any way she can.
And yes, there is a gamer-superior in her convent.
“She has this souped-up computer,” Burns continued. “She gets her own little ministry out there. Once people get to know she’s a nun, they have questions, or they ask for prayers. But you do have to clean up your language when Sister Irene’s out there.”
I imagine Sister Irene sitting in front of a sleek desktop with neon LED backlights, wearing her bright yellow Grado headphones and concentrating intensely on a multi-player RPG. It’s a funny image—there’s such a symbolic disconnect between the stereotypical idea of a nun and a basement-dwelling teenager who loves World of Warcraft. That’s what’s so fascinating about these sisters and their order: They defy stereotypes about who participates in Internet culture, and how.
So how does a nun use social media?
Read more. [Image courtesy of Helena Burns]

theatlantic:

The Nun Who Got Addicted to Twitter

“My superior is a gamer.” Sister Helena Burns said, laughing. “You know you’re a media nun when your superior is a gamer.” 

You might not expect nuns to be experts on Twitter, Facebook, and multi-player video games, but Burns defies all expectations. With 13,790 Twitter followers and counting, the Daughter of St. Paul calls herself a “media nun”: A woman religious with a calling to communicate the word of Christ, in any way she can.

And yes, there is a gamer-superior in her convent.

“She has this souped-up computer,” Burns continued. “She gets her own little ministry out there. Once people get to know she’s a nun, they have questions, or they ask for prayers. But you do have to clean up your language when Sister Irene’s out there.”

I imagine Sister Irene sitting in front of a sleek desktop with neon LED backlights, wearing her bright yellow Grado headphones and concentrating intensely on a multi-player RPG. It’s a funny image—there’s such a symbolic disconnect between the stereotypical idea of a nun and a basement-dwelling teenager who loves World of Warcraft. That’s what’s so fascinating about these sisters and their order: They defy stereotypes about who participates in Internet culture, and how.

So how does a nun use social media?

Read more. [Image courtesy of Helena Burns]